Video of Cell Phone



Quote on the back of the phone

The text on the back of this work says: "Whenever possible, logical constructions are to be substituted for inferred entities." This quote was said by Bertrand Russel, a British philosopher. (http://www.sparknotes.com/philosophy/russell/section3.rhtml) (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bertrand_Russell#cite_note-Gallery-6) This quote means that any imaginary or assumed beings should be immediately replaced if logical constructions form. This is fitting, as Russel himself is an agnostic (http://www.luminary.us/russell/atheist_agnostic.html), which neither accepts nor denies the existence of God. This raises the possible interpretation of the phone representing prayer, as supported by another quote in the center of the phone: "Honest men esteem and value nothing so much in this world as a real friend. Such one is as it were another self, to whom we impart our most secret [...] who partakes in our joy and [...] us in our [...]." This description fits God perfectly for many people.

Quote inside phone

"Honest men esteem and value nothing so much in this world as a real friend. Such a one is as it were another self, to whom we impart our most secret thoughts, who partakes of our joy, and comforts us in our affliction; add to this, that his company is an everlasting pleasure to us," is a quote from the Brahmin gymnosophist Bidpai, who lived several centuries before Christ.

http://www.1911encyclopedia.org/Bidpai This site contains more information about Bidpai and his works.
http://www.giga-usa.com/quotes/authors/bidpai_a001.htm This site contains more quotes by Bidpai.


PIDPAI Biography

The fables and proverbs which pass under the name of PILPAY or BIDPAI consist mainly of the Pantcha Santra, or Five Sections, and the Hitopadesa, or Friendly Instructor, which were translated into Persian in the fifth century A.D. They were afterwards translated into Arabic; and in 1709 the Persian version was translated into French under the title of Les Conseils et les Maximes de Pilpay, which appear in English as The Instructive and Entertaining Fables of Pilpay. The name of Pilpay appears to have been first attributed to the collection in Persia, the reputed Hindu author being Vishnu-Sarma.
These fables are the earliest collection in the world, and greatly surpass in humour and in variety of matter and of lesson the Fables of Aesop. There is at the same time similarity enough between the two collections to suggest a common source. The Sanskrit fables are supposed to be told by their author for the education of the children of a certain rajah, and form a wonderfully interconnected series. The animals introduced relate other stories to one another, and deliver many proverbs and practical moral precepts, which form a much more important part of this collection of fables than of any other.
http://www.usefultrivia.com/biographies/pilpay_001.html